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Stephanie Cartwright

Valentina’s Story: The impact of Children’s Camps

Valentina and her seven-year-old daughter fled from Ukraine as refugees and found help and hope at one of Mission Eurasia’s partner churches in Poland that provides summer Bible camps for Ukrainian refugee children. The pastor of this church, Pastor Vitali, shares this story of how Valentina found salvation in Christ after inquiring about summer Bible camp for her daughter:    “Heaven rejoices! One more soul has joined the family of believers! A woman named Valentina called me a few weeks ago and said, ‘Hello! I know that you hold children’s camps. My friend’s child was at your Christian camp. Please tell me, are you currently conducting classes for children? I would like my child to attend so she can learn more about God.’  “So I invited Valentina and her daughter to attend a Sunday worship service at our church last Sunday. Valentina listened attentively and cried throughout the entire sermon.  As…

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Victor

victor

Living in a war is terrifying, and going through it alone is incredibly challenging. Victor knows this firsthand, as he has to hear with daily explosions in his crumbling house. Ever since his wife died, his once cozy home has gradually transformed into a place that barely resembles the welcoming place he used to return to after a hard day. Despite that, Victor stays home, unable to part ways with a place that holds countless cherished memories. In the war-torn village, life progresses from one shelling to the next, leaving Victor in constant uncertainty about the danger he will face each day. A rocket’s devastating impact recently struck his garden, causing irreparable damage to his home. There are now cracks in the walls, and the chimney isn’t working. With no other alternative, Victor continued to heat his stove. All the smoke stayed inside, making the house look worse, and causing…

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Olga

Olga

A bomb exploded 50 meters away from Olga. The blast wave threw her into the hay barn where she was going to tend her cow. One piece of shrapnel grazed her head without causing serious injury. Later, the woman found several other large pieces of shrapnel nearby. It was a miracle that Olga remained alive and almost unharmed. During the war, living in an active combat zone in the Zaporizhzhia region, Olga saw many terrible things: a neighbor whose leg was torn off, an explosion in a barn that killed three cows, at every turn she came across unexploded cluster bombs and many pieces of shrapnel. She can already tell the difference between explosions and knows how to know the next one is coming – but even that doesn’t always help her take cover in time. “I’m afraid to see my house destroyed,” the woman explains why she doesn’t want…

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Anna and her Family

Anna and family

As a young girl, Anna studied at Kyiv University but always dreamed of living in her hometown of Kramatorsk. She shares, “I knew I would want to have my family in my hometown.” So, after I returned home, I started doing what I love the most – working as a manicurist. It was there that I met my future husband, Misha. We got married and started our family business – a salon where he worked as a masseur.” The couple had two children, Emilia and Yan, and were so happy! They had a special tradition on Saturdays. Anna would go with the kids to the pool, and then they would all go to their favorite pizza place where Misha would already be waiting for them with a huge smile and pizza on the table. However, their happy life changed in February 2023. Their hometown turned out to be close to…

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Story of Sasha

Story of Sasha

Olga, 32, and her two daughters, Sasha (almost 3) and Nastia (17), lived in Mykolayiv, Ukraine. Like most families, they woke up to the war early on February 24, 2022. Olga, her daughters, her husband, and her parents saw the horrors of the war on the first day, as Mykolayiv basically became the frontlines. Russian tanks were close to the town a few days later. Olga’s parents are older people who both have disabilities, which made it impossible for them to evacuate. They needed special transportation for that, which was impossible to find. So, the decision was made for Olga’s husband to stay at home with the parents, and for Olga to leave with the girls. They made it to the evacuation bus that went to Poland. Four days later, they were in Krakow. Nastia was a huge help to her mother and little sister in Poland, as she had…

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Story of Anastasia and Emilia

Anastasia and Emilia gift of hope Poland

Yulia and her two daughters, 6-year-old Anastasia and 2-year-old Emilia, fled the war from the town of Boryspil just outside of Kyiv. Yulia’s family experienced all the horrors of war in the very first hours of the Russian terrorists’ attack. Russia’s first missiles were aimed at military bases and airports. The town of Boryspil, where Yulia lived with her husband and daughters, was home to Ukraine’s primary and largest airport. No wonder it was among the very first targets on February 24. From her window, Yulia, who lived in a high-rise apartment building, could see and hear the explosions around the airport. Horror and helplessness overwhelmed her. Yulia’s little daughters started to cry, covering their ears as the explosions could be heard very close to their house. A few days later, as the Russian occupation forces proceeded to take over more and more territory in the Kyiv region, Yulia’s husband…

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